Euonymus Plant

 Euonymus Fortunei, Euonymus Fortunei Vine

 

This plant is a woody vine. This plant is naturally native to Asia. This ornamental plant is excellent for any home. This plant is a beauty when its berries come and add a dash of orange color.

Euonymus Fortunei is an evergreen, perennial, flowering plant native to East Asia. Its range includes China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand. Common names for this plant include Fortune’s Spindle, Spindle, Winter Creeper and Wintercreeper. Euonymus Fortunei was introduced to North America in 1907, as a decorative ground cover. In its native region, it is commonly seen growing in forests and woodlands. The plant was named after the renowned Scottish plant hunter and botanist, Robert Fortune.

 

Euonymus Fortunei grows as a low shrub or as a vine if provided support, and it climbs with the help of rootlets protruding from the narrow stem, like ivy. The leaves are arranged opposite to one another, in an elliptic or elliptic-ovate shape. The margins of the leaves are serrated and approximately 2-6 cm long and 1-3 cm wide. Its fruit is a small pod, whose four lobes open when mature to expose four orange seeds, one for each lobe. Along the ground, it can trail about 6 m long, and with vertical support, it can grow 12-21 m tall.

 

Three varieties of the plant exist, they are named as follows: fortunei, radicals, and vegetus. It is debatable whether radicans and vegetus are separate varieties or the same. Most ornamental cultivars of Euonymus Fortunei are of the radical type. ‘Emerald Gaiety,’ ‘Emerald ‘n’ Gold,’ and ‘Emerald Surprise’ are award-winning cultivars of Euonymus Fortunei. Its cultivars vary mainly in leaf color and size.

 

As it is very hardy even in cold weather and is shade tolerant, it has become an invasive species in some parts of the United States and Canada. Birds, water, and small animals spread its small seeds, and it rapidly spreads to form a dense carpet on the ground. This disturbs the growth of other shrubs and small seedlings. When it trails vertically on trees, it can rapidly cover the leaves, preventing photosynthesis.

 

It is recommended that this plant not is purposefully planted. If planted, it should be contained within a concrete barrier on all sides to prevent spreading. It should also not be allowed to climb, as this facilitates the spreading of seeds.

 

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Description

 Euonymus Fortunei, Euonymus Fortunei Vine

 

This plant is a woody vine. This plant is naturally native to Asia. This ornamental plant is excellent for any home. This plant is a beauty when its berries come and add a dash of orange color.

Euonymus Fortunei is an evergreen, perennial, flowering plant native to East Asia. Its range includes China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand. Common names for this plant include Fortune’s Spindle, Spindle, Winter Creeper and Wintercreeper. Euonymus Fortunei was introduced to North America in 1907, as a decorative ground cover. In its native region, it is commonly seen growing in forests and woodlands. The plant was named after the renowned Scottish plant hunter and botanist, Robert Fortune.

 

Euonymus Fortunei grows as a low shrub or as a vine if provided support, and it climbs with the help of rootlets protruding from the narrow stem, like ivy. The leaves are arranged opposite to one another, in an elliptic or elliptic-ovate shape. The margins of the leaves are serrated and approximately 2-6 cm long and 1-3 cm wide. Its fruit is a small pod, whose four lobes open when mature to expose four orange seeds, one for each lobe. Along the ground, it can trail about 6 m long, and with vertical support, it can grow 12-21 m tall.

 

Three varieties of the plant exist, they are named as follows: fortunei, radicals, and vegetus. It is debatable whether radicans and vegetus are separate varieties or the same. Most ornamental cultivars of Euonymus Fortunei are of the radical type. ‘Emerald Gaiety,’ ‘Emerald ‘n’ Gold,’ and ‘Emerald Surprise’ are award-winning cultivars of Euonymus Fortunei. Its cultivars vary mainly in leaf color and size.

 

As it is very hardy even in cold weather and is shade tolerant, it has become an invasive species in some parts of the United States and Canada. Birds, water, and small animals spread its small seeds, and it rapidly spreads to form a dense carpet on the ground. This disturbs the growth of other shrubs and small seedlings. When it trails vertically on trees, it can rapidly cover the leaves, preventing photosynthesis.

 

It is recommended that this plant not is purposefully planted. If planted, it should be contained within a concrete barrier on all sides to prevent spreading. It should also not be allowed to climb, as this facilitates the spreading of seeds.

 

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Additional info

Depth: 100.00
Min Purchase Qty: 100 units