​Mountain Maple

​Mountain Maple

Posted by Tammy Sons on Jun 02, 2017

This hardy Maple Tree is native to North America and has a broad range of natural habitats on the eastern seaboard. You can readily find it from Newfoundland, Canada to Pennsylvania, and throughout the Appalachian Mountains down into Georgia. The range also expands to Saskatchewan and down to the upper Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, encompassing the Great Lakes region and beyond Ohio. The tree is also recognized and known as a deciduous shrub because it is considered a smaller tree that generally grows from 10-25 feet in height at its peak. The top of the tree spreads branches into a distinctive crown, and it is widely recognized for featuring slender branches and a shorter trunk.

The leaves are light green and are considered moderate in size, spanning between 2 and 4 inches when the tree reaches maturity. The leaves turn a brilliant yellow or red in autumn, making it a lovely accent for any yard or garden. The tree thrives in moist wooded areas, near streams, hillsides, or any well-drained soil type. As with all Maple Trees, the sap of this tree is an excellent source of Maple Syrup and is readily used as a primary source throughout parts of Canada and New England. Additionally, the bark contains what is known as tannins which are used for dying and tanning leathers.

The Native Americans were known to use parts of the tree for homeopathic remedies such as relieving stress and calming eye irritations. Still, it has been used for maple sugar products for centuries. It is an excellent tree for shading yards and garden areas. Additionally, it is a smaller deciduous tree species-it affords gardeners and property owners a more remarkable ability to maintain them more readily for pruning. The more significant tree species types such as the oaks, hickory, and pine trees grow up to 60-80 feet or greater in height, making them less adaptable to pruning as they mature.