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Blackberry Plant

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Minimum Purchase:
25 units
Description:
Blackberry bush is botanically from the species Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family. Many different strains come from the same genus Rubus, with some being bread without thorns, while others are hardier for harsher climates.
Status: In Stock
Current Stock:
$2.75
Here's how your plants will look on arrival. All plants are dormant with no leaves or foliage.
BeforeAfter

Southern Blackberry - Rubus argutus

 
Southern Blackberry, also called the sawtooth blackberry for the saw like thorns on its vines, is common across the Southeastern United States. Its leaves are rigid green ovals that sprout from the grapes. Each root can produce several vines, though one or two may show up at first. The berries become green from early spring (March to early May) and will turn red towards the end of May or the end of June. The size of the Berry, which will become ripe and purple/black, all depends upon the conditions in which it is grown.
 
They thrive along the eastern coast, as well as in the cool-night areas of the Appalachians, Ozarks, and Blue Ridge Mountains. The bud, or flower, of the blackberry, will turn white and bloom before a berry is produced, most of the time a stem will jut out from the stalk, or vine. This is where the berry or berries will hang when they grow. The vines are covered with thorns of no more than an inch or two. The barbs are green at the base, red in the middle, and white or bright red/pink at the pointed tip. This beautiful plant's vines will grow along a fence or any structure near to where you plant them.
 
A word of warning though, if allowed to become unkempt and unruly, the plant will quickly take over any property. A good rule of thumb to go by with these wondrously delicious berries is to trim every vine that produced fruit in any given season. This vine will not produce fruit the next year and should be cleared to make way for the next generation. Also, any dead or gray vines should be pulled from the root up, as they will form large, nonfruit-bearing, empty spots within a bush or group of vines which will become unsightly and unruly. Blackberries are often considered one of the easiest fruits to grow at home. They are a native species to the United States and grow as a small shrub or trailing vine. The fruit from this plant can be used for table fruit, syrup, jams and jelly.